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Free Run for Ferrets

Whether it’s a cage, enclosure, or entire room, ferrets can never have enough space. That’s why the little rascals need several hours of free run every day, regardless of how big their home is.

When ferrets explore the home, they should always be supervised. Nothing they see is safe. It is therefore hardly possible to make an entire apartment absolutely safe for these animals. Also, you get to know your animals best by observing them a lot. Then you will notice unusual behavior more quickly and you can react in time if you become ill. Although it is inconvenient, there are still ferret owners who let their pets roam free around the house like a cat 24/7. This way of life is ideal for the animals. They have plenty of space to play and romp and can be with their people whenever they want. Of course, these animals also need a cage that belongs only to them. It is also very important that all sources of danger in the house have been eliminated.

The safe apartment

It is best to keep indoor plants out of reach. Ferrets are passionate about digging, including potting soil. In addition, some plants can be poisonous for the little rascals. Cleaning agents, medicines, and other chemicals should also not be accessible to the animals. They can very easily get poisoned by it. Bags and bags are another hazards. If ferrets get caught in them, they can pose a choking hazard. Cupboards, drawers, and washing machines should always be securely locked so that the nimble animals are not accidentally trapped anywhere.

Windows and doors must also not be left open, otherwise, the cheeky ferrets will quickly escape. Loose cables lying around are very dangerous. If the animals bite through them, they can get an electric shock. Drowning and burning are other dangers. Don’t let the animals near a full bathtub or a lit candle. Small objects that the ferrets could swallow should not be left lying around in the apartment. Also, keep all valuables and clothing safe. The little thieves pay no heed to anything and carry off everything they can carry.

Where is it?

Ferrets are incredibly quick and agile. Despite all caution, it can happen that an animal escapes through a gap or a door. Now it’s time to keep calm! If the fugitive is still in the house, the contingency plan is as follows: Close the room the ferret escaped to immediately. Also close the windows, all drawers, and cupboards. Seal niches and gaps behind furniture. If the pen is in the same room, open it and place a treat right by the entrance. If the cage is in another room, provide the animal with another den. This can be a sleeping house or a transport box. Put clothes and lining inside. Then leave the room and give the animal rest for several hours.

When you check in the morning, chances are your pet is sleeping peacefully in its den. If the ferret escaped into the open, the chances are worse. Don’t chase after the runaway, it will only scare him more. Make sure it is quiet, provide the animal with a den with food and wait a night. If the ferret is not in the burrow the next morning, notify your neighbors and your local animal shelters and veterinarians. Maybe someone saw your little friend.

Excursions into the countryside

Most ferrets adapt quickly to a harness and leash and enjoy nature walks. There are special harnesses for ferrets in pet shops. In order to carefully get the animals used to the unusual accessory, first put it in their cage for a few days. Then you can try it on the little rascals when they run free. Do not buckle the harness too tight. One finger should still fit between the ferret and the harness. It’s best to give your pet a treat the first few times you put it on. The ferret will then immediately associate the odd piece of clothing with something positive.

Once the little goblins have gotten used to the harness, you can put the animals on a leash and take their first trips into the garden. There the little robbers will run around enthusiastically and dig in the ground. They quickly learn to walk on a leash, so nothing stands in the way of longer walks. However, you should never unleash ferrets. They are and remain small predators and can escape quickly.

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