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Czechoslovakian Wolfdog

There is still real wolf blood in this dog breed – and that makes it a real challenge. Here you can find out why the Czechoslovakian wolfdog is only suitable for dog connoisseurs.

Size: 60-65cm
Weight: 20-26 kilos
Coat length: short
Coat Colors: Blue/Grey, Gold/Yellow
Country of origin: Slovak Republic
Classification: FCI Group 1: Herding and Cattle Dogs, Section 1: Shepherd Dogs

The Czechoslovakian wolfdog is a cross between a German shepherd and a Carpathian wolf. In character, this breed is very similar to the wolf. But not only his strong temperament makes him a very demanding breed. Here you can read everything about the origin, character, upbringing and care of the Czechoslovakian wolfdog.

Origin and history

In what was then Czechoslovakia (CSSR), a biological experiment took place in 1955: the German shepherd was crossed with a Carpathian wolf. The result was a four-legged friend with the usable characteristics of the wolf and the favorable characteristics of the dog, as described by the VDH.

In 1982, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog was finally recognized as a separate breed.

The appearance of the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog

The Czechoslovakian Wolfhound is large and strongly reminiscent of a wolf: physique, movement, and coat are very wolf-like. The fur is short and yellow-grey to silver-grey with the typical “mask” on the head.

Behavior and temperament

The Czechoslovakian Wolfhound is very spirited, active and courageous. He reacts quickly and fearlessly. In addition, he is persistent and resilient. Its character corresponds more to that of the wolf and is very susceptible to stress in some situations: noise, hectic activity or many people around it make the Czechoslovakian wolfdog nervous. Unfamiliar situations unsettle him. In general, the breed is rather shy and very suspicious of strangers.

However, the Czechoslovakian wolfdog is loyal to its owner. He always wants to be near you and needs a lot of attention. In order for this dog to become a well-balanced and reliable member of the family, it is imperative that it is raised properly.

Education of the Czechoslovakian wolfdog

This breed is very demanding and only for full professionals. It is imperative that the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog be raised respectfully and well socialized. If you choose this dog, you have to invest a lot of patience and time in the relationship: the Czechoslovakian wolfdog shows little interest in subordination, preferring to be a partner rather than a servant. The advice of an experienced dog trainer is highly recommended for this breed.

The Czechoslovakian wolfhound is usually friendly and patient with children. However, he is sensitive to noise, which is why children could disturb him in the household. As a family dog, this breed is, therefore, less suitable.

In addition, the Czechoslovakian wolfdog is very hunting-motivated and usually only gets along with conspecifics to a limited extent. You also have to take this into account when training.

The right job

The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog needs a lot of exercises. It is particularly recommended to let him run long distances next to the bike. It is suitable for dog sports and can perform particularly well in tracking work.

Ideally, the Czechoslovak Wolfdog will be kept in a home with a large, fenced yard.

Grooming of the Czechoslovakian wolfdog

The coat of this dog breed is very thick and needs regular brushing. This is especially true when changing fur.

Common diseases

The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is considered a very hardy breed. Hip dysplasia can happen but is very rare thanks to reputable breeders.

Purchase

Dogs of this breed absolutely need an owner with a lot of experience. Only those who can and really want to deal with the animal should get a Czechoslovakian wolfdog. This breed is absolutely unsuitable for beginners.

For such a puppy you should reckon with $1,100 to $1,500. When buying a puppy, be sure to contact a reputable breeder. Only if the dog breeder is properly informed whether you can do justice to this breed, can he be trusted.

If you can really offer the demanding Czechoslovakian wolfdog everything he needs, nothing stands in the way of a future together.

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